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Olympic National Park
for Wheelers and Slow Walkers

Olympic National Park
for Wheelers and Slow Walkers

Located on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, Olympic National Park occupies nearly one million acres filled with sub-alpine forests, wildflower-filled meadows, rainforest habitat and a rugged coastal shore. The entire park can be accessed from Highway 101, which circumnavigates the Olympic Peninsula; and each area of the park features a small visitor center or ranger station which offers exhibits on the local ecosystem and the history of the area.

Insider Tips

  • Save some time for a soak at Sol Duc Hot Springs when you visit the park. There’s ramp access to the Sol Duc Hot Springs front office, with barrier-free access to the pools in back. The mineral wading pool is reserved for children under three, but the Large Mineral Fountain Pool and the Freshwater Pool feature ramp access. There is also a portable pool lift available for these pools or for the Medium Mineral Pool, which isn’t ramped.
  • The Glines Canyon Spillway Overlook offers an interesting perspective on the result of the Elwha Dam Restoration Project. This massive undertaking began in September 2011 with the removal of the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams on the Elwha River. Today, there’s accessible parking with level access to the Glines Canyon Spillway Overlook, which leads out over the top of the former spillway. Interpretive panels and audio kiosks dot the short path to the overlook, but the big attraction of this site is the breathtaking view down into the river.
  • For a very comfortable - and romantic - overnight in the park be sure and book a cabin at Kalaloch Lodge, which is located on the Pacific Coast. This remote lodge offers two accessible cabins, with great coastal views, as well as a small restaurant and grocery store. Everything you want and need for a blissful getaway!
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